Tag Archives: TFSAs

Wills – Even Death Has a Fee

death-tax

I recently got a will. I went through a lawyer, and was quoted a notarized will for my wife and I at $400 each. With the lawyer, it was an intimidating experience at first, but I did some research on my own and found that you can get a will drafted for free, and notarized for as little as $15. Currently, I am in the process of trying to get a more competitive rate.

How did this all come about? I remember a few months ago seeing a story about a wealthy, well respected family being torn apart over an inheritance. Millions were collectively spent on lawyers. I don’t know how that mess turned out, but I’ve heard about crazy family members who launch lawsuits over an inheritance dispute. To add to the deep emotional damage such a conflict would inflict, the truth is that the only people guaranteed to benefit will be lawyers.

It seems that every family has crazy relatives, and it seems that if you have any considerable worth in your estate at all, you might want to spend the extra time and money to be clear on how you want your estate divided and passed on and stop any potential conflicts from ever happening.

What kind of things are part of your estate? The first thing to be factored is any debt you have, including credit cards, mortgages, and car loans. They are paid off before your estate and any estate beneficiaries. Once debts are settled, all your remaining assets with financial value, such as insurance policies, cash, TFSAs, homes, cars, appliances, and furnishings are added up and considered to be the value of your estate. If your spouse survives you, your estate is considered to be shared 50/50.

Once the value of your estate is ascertained, the provincial government will then proceed to tax it. As per the Ontario Ministry of Finance, the inheritance tax will be $3100 on an estate valued at $240,000.

Note that your RRSPs can be directly transferred to a family beneficiary with no tax penalty at all. You can setup an RRSP tax beneficiary at any time. If you don’t, your RRSP will be converted to cash and taxed as income in your final year and added to your estate to then be subjected to the inheritance tax.

If you don’t have a will, it will be up to the government to decide how to divide your estate. You should check how your province divides your estate as different provinces follow different guidelines. Often, your spouse and/or children will get everything. If you want to leave something for siblings, friends, charities, your community, university, or any other person or thing, you’ll want to put a will together. If you are looking for some ideas, you should search to see what unusual things people have left in their wills.