Tag Archives: stock market

First Rule of Investing in Stock

first tip investing

If you had invested in Microsoft back in 1986, when they went public with their Initial Public Offering (IPO), you would have made 44,000% return on your investment (ROI). If you had invested $1000 in Microsoft then, it would be worth  $44 million today. This is why Bill Gates is still the richest man in the world, he owned the majority of Microsoft when it went public some 29 years ago.

Stories like this aren’t uncommon. Pretty much every publicly listed silicon valley company started off like Microsoft, and consequentially has amazingly wealthy founders. And thanks to stock markets, the ability to invest in other people’s good ideas and hard work is available to anyone.

There are many books, websites and careers based on investing in the stock market. So for this introductory post on the subject, I will simply say this: Invest in what you know.

To better illustrate this concept, consider this story that took place in the 1930’s. It was a party that a celebrated banker was throwing, he invited his business clients and colleagues. At the time, women weren’t involved in money matters much, especially the money matters of their extremely wealthy husbands. But the banker’s wife had inherited a small fortune from the death of a relative and wanted to grow the money herself.

She knew from listening to her husband and his friends talking about investing all the time that putting her money in the stock market was the best way to grow it. She saw one of her husband’s investment friends, Benjamin Graham, who at the time was a well respected investor (who later went on to define value investing, and teach other greats, like Warren Buffet).

The banker’s wife asked Benjamin, “What should I invest my money in?” to which Benjamin answered, “never invest your money into something you don’t understand. Invest your money in something you not only understand, but use every day.”

No one knew what the banker’s wife did with her money. Decades later, after her death, it was discovered that she had made a massive fortune, much more than her husband ever made, on the stock market. As it turned out, she followed Benjamin’s advice directly and invested in a revolutionary idea that she was uniquely positioned to appreciate, Tampax, the first makers of modern tampons.

If you don’t know what you’re investing in, you are literally relying on luck. It is possible that some solar panel company that just started up is going to go somewhere, but unless you know about solar technology, or how that industry works, all you can do is hope to get lucky, because you don’t understand what needs to happen for a company to be successful in the solar energy market.

I can’t tell you how much the concept of investing in what you know has changed my money outlook. I have invested in Google, and Visa because I use their products almost every day and I understand how their business models work. I love Netflix, and am very happy that I invested in them 5 years ago, before everyone had a subscription.*

In fact, all my dud investments (and there are a lot of them) have all been in companies I didn’t use or understand.

If you have some extra money you want to play with, and a couple good investment ideas that you personally use daily, then there is no shortage of companies for you to invest in. This means that if you love comic books and video games, invest in Disney (as they own Marvel now, and Star Wars, and have bankrolled all the big superhero movies in recent years). Like playing video games? Put your money where your mouth is, EA and Activision are on the Nasdaq, so is Sony and Xbox. Making lots of money with your home made goods business on Etsy or eBay? Maybe your unique experience makes investing in those companies a good idea to you.

A little more grown up than games and comics, and short of ideas? You should pay for an annual subscription to a publication that analyses individual companies for you. I have subscribed to the Motley Fool before, and indeed, that’s where I first read about investing in Netflix or Marvel. It is a great way to read about what other investors have to say about a lot of popular, and up and coming companies.

* As a full disclosure, I currently own shares in Disney, Google, Netflix and Visa. Though they have been a good investment for me over the years, they might treat you differently tomorrow.

Taking Action – Buying Stock

taking action - buying stock

Tired of savings accounts that lose you money? Want more growth and less fees than your bank’s mutual funds can offer? Thinking about giving the S&P 500 a whirl, but don’t know where to start? This post is for you!

Last week, we looked at stock markets and how their purpose is to let the public buy and sell shares in publicly traded companies. I mentioned that to invest in the S&P 500, you’ll need to buy an Exchange Traded Fund (ETF), like Vanguard’s S&P 500 index fund.

In order to buy and sell shares on a stock market, you need an stock broker, someone who has gone through various training programs and is regulated by the stock exchanged they work on. A stock broker is traditionally a person who takes buy/sell orders from individuals and fulfills those orders on the stock market floor by yelling and screaming at other stock brokers. Stock brokers usually charge a commission on every trade, that means if you want to buy some shares in company A and sell shares in companies B, that would be 2 separate trades, and your broker will charge you for each.

These days, the job of stock broker has been largely replaced by computers. So what we really need is a web broker. For you and I, a web broker is a website where we fill out a form specifying how many shares to buy or sell, at what price, etc. We then hit ‘Enter’ to buy and sell stocks. The web broker then trades your money with another web broker. The whole transaction could take seconds.

There are dozens of web brokers to chose from and every major bank in Canada has one, they are cheap and easy to use. How cheap are they? Well, that depends on what kind of investing you’re going to be doing and how often. As I mentioned, they will typically charge you per trade and web broker prices currently range from limited-time-free to $10 per trade.

The cost of a web broker is a fee, the third prong in the trident of costs (taxes and inflation being the other 2) and means that if you want to invest money every month, that could be $120 per year, which won’t be that big in the grand scheme of things, especially compared to some mutual fund fees. But I suggest planning on buying shares of TSE:VFV every 3 or 4 months to cut down on fees. Some web brokers can set up automated buying so all you need to worry about is having money in the bank.

Finding and opening a web broker account is easy. I would go to whoever your current bank is and tell them you’d like to open a web broker account. Here is a list of the 5 big banks and their web brokers:

If you aren’t with any of the above banks, you can still open a web broker account with them, or google around for another one. As long as the web broker allows you to trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSE or TSX), you should be fine.

To open a web broker account, I would suggest physically walking into your bank and telling them that you want to open a web broker account, and someone will meet you to go over whatever steps are needed to setup an account. The banks do all the work for you, but there are quite a few forms they have to fill out, the process can easily take 30 minutes.

I would open up a web broker account for your TFSA, and a second web broker account for your RRSP. This will allow you to transfer money into your tax sheltered accounts, and buy and sell as much as you want without incurring any taxes. You would only pay taxes when you withdraw money from your RRSP web broker account. You will never pay any taxes on money withdrawn from any TFSA account, and you are able to withdraw money from your TFSA whenever you want.

Once your account is open, and you have a trading password, you are ready to buy a stock! The stock we want to buy is Vanguard’s S&P 500 ETF I mentioned earlier. It trades under the symbol: TSE:VFV.

This means <stock exchange>:<company stock symbol>, so TSE is the stock exchange, VFV is the symbol of the fund or company we want to invest in.

Things you’ll need to know to buy stock on any exchange:

  • The account the funds to make the purchase are coming from.
  • The action you wish to take (buy, sell, other stuff we don’t care about).
  • The company symbol.
  • How many shares you want to buy.

When deciding how many shares to buy, remember to factor in any web broker fees. If you have $1000, you can only buy 9 shares that cost $100 (9 x $100 = $900, + $6 (web broker fee) = $906)

You can buy VFV from your web broker’s website, or you can phone up the web broker directly and have a human to actually make the trade for you. Note that web brokers are neutral parties when buying/selling shares. They will not give you investment advice, so don’t bother asking them if buying particular shares is a good idea.

Don’t bother trying to time when you buy the S&P 500, in the long run, that won’t matter. Once you’ve bought your shares, hold them. Literally do nothing for decades and watch the value of your investment grow.