Financial Goals – What It’s All About

financial-goals

What am I saving money for?

For myself, this is the most important of all financial matters to get right. If I didn’t have a financial goal, I would simply lack the motivation to save. Having a goal constantly reminds me of what I’m working for, and gives me a light at the (far) end of the tunnel. To me, it is the most reassuring thing to think about after a rough day, knowing a plan is in place, and underway and that I’m not simply spinning my tires.

As I mentioned in my first post, my personal financial goal is to become financially independent as soon as possible. How will I be financially independent? I will be living off the the interest of my savings! The S&P 500 has a long term annual return of 12.65%. If you had $1,000,000, that would be $126,500 in interest a year! Of course, once you factor in inflation, fees and taxes, you would be looking at a more modest, but still ample, return.

My goal helps me in more ways than giving me a sense of purpose, it also helps me know where to put my money. The S&P 500 is a great long term (at least 5 years) investment, which is what I need for my personal financial goal.

But what if your reason to save money is more short term? What if you are saving up for a down payment on a house, or something that will require you to spend your money within 5 years?

The S&P 500 is pretty safe as far as stock investments go. But it still has its down years, like 2008, the year of the great recession. Had you invested at the end of 2007, it would have taken 5 years for the S&P 500 index to grow back to the price you bought it at.

If you are investing for the short term, that probably means you have something fairly specific in mind you want to buy (house, car, vacation, etc). If you say “I want to save up $100,000 for a down payment on a house in 5 years,” you may value the added certainty of knowing your money will be there in 5 years with a little bit of interest accrued, rather than be less sure your money will be there in 5 years, but with more interest accrued. The cost of safer investments is a lower return, and is a cost worth bearing if you are looking for a more short term place to invest your money.

For shorter term investments, I suggest looking at government bonds, GICs, or even a high interest savings account. There are also many safe mutual funds and Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) that will also achieve the same effect. They will not grow your money much, but they are very safe. The small amount they grow is better than nothing. Having anything offset the constant encroachment of inflation is important. And if you need a place to stash your cash short term, these are great savings options.

 

 

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